Thursday, August 20, 2009

The "Rockstar Leniency Rule" Explained


Some remain confused about what exactly is meant by the “Rockstar Leniency Rule.”

To wit (to Chiam Witz), here it is explained again:

In certain specific cases, those in which dressing up in douchesque ways are part of a theatrical or musical spectacle, there is some leeway granted before we tag “douche.”

This covers the carnivalesque superhero (like the WWE), the stage show singer/performer (Kiss, Van Halen) and the from-the-streets success story (Lil’ Wayne, 2Pac, Jewel Kilcher).

If musical success has been achieved, douchosity can be seen as a necessary costume or affect — like whooping cough. It is not necessarily forgivable, it is simply factored in as potentially a part of the performative spectacle.

The second part of the R.L.R. involves factoring in humor or self-deprecation. Justin Timberlake, long seen as a major carrier of the Grieco Virus, has mostly redeemed himself by participating in self mocking and taking the piss out of his “pretty boy” construct. I’m not ready to grant Timberlake a full nottadouche just yet, but he’s on the road of recovery.

Again, this is a case by case basis.

Kid Rock remains an ubersquat both on and off stage, no RLR granted. John Mayer attempts humorous self deprecation to appeal for an RLR, but in his case, Mayer simply reveals the gargantuan ego of the true douche rotting and festering in his soul.

The RLR is never automatic. It merely allows us leeway to account for the performative by the entertainer that we wouldn’t grant to, say, one of the Joey Porsche Long Island poseur crew.

# posted by douchebag1

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